A new video series produced by the Marine Industries Association of South Florida promises to give outsiders a real-life, up-close perspective of jobs in the world of boating. Called “Salty Jobs,” the educational series aims to showcase marine career opportunities throughout South Florida.
You’ve probably never heard of EE-3, a small artificial reef in the Gulf of Mexico. You might have heard briefly of James Taylor Waldron, a soldier who died in action in Vietnam, and was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry, but that was long ago and his brother supposes you’ve forgotten.
When word came that Bill Curtis had passed at age 91, I supposed he was stalling at the Sea of Galilee. He would be casting Florida saltwater flies in hopes of hooking one last big one before applying for admission at the Pearly Gates. Surely he’d have asked about the fishing inside. Bill would want to know before committing.
Nigel Ingram was once a typical yacht captain of the 1970s and ’80s, delivering racing boats throughout the United States and Europe with pickup crews and pushing 40- to 60-foot yachts across starting lines and race courses throughout the Atlantic.
When villains arise, so do heroes. Two cases in point: David Garrett of Ormond Beach slew 3,324 lionfish with a scuba diver’s spear gun. Samson, an Israelite, slew a thousand (estimated) Philistines with a donkey’s jawbone.
When the America’s Cup turned the sailing world upside down in 2013 by racing hydrofoiling, 72-foot catamarans, the model of the 40-something professional sailor that had long dominated Cup sailing was left in the boiling, 50-knot wake of the new boats.

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